Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Pope Benedict sends first tweet to over 1m followers

The Catholic pontiff, Pope Benedict XVI sent his first tweet today signaling one of the most high profile endorsement of the social media revolution in recent times.
According to Guardian of UK, "future generations of theologians will look back on today with a mixture of awe and reverence. For on the 12th day of the 12th month of the 12th year of the millennium, Pope Benedict XVI made his foray on to Twitter."
Although the pope may not send out each tweet -- an assistant will do it for him -- the Vatican insists that these "sparks of truth" will all have his input and approval. The pope is expected to tweet weekly and during papal ceremonies and feast days.
The pope's first @Pontifex tweet -- which was typed by an assistant but sent by Benedict -- already has nearly 35,000 retweets. According to the Vatican, papal tweets will from here on out be typed and sent by assistants, but written with Benedict's guidance.


After his initial tweet, the pope also responded to three questions posted by followers. He addressed a mom who asked: "Any suggestions on how to be more prayerful when we are so busy with the demands of work, families and the world?"
Benedict replied: "Offer everything you do to the Lord, ask his help in all the circumstances of daily life and remember that he is always beside you."
His blessing, the first tweet from his new personal account, @pontifex, flew out at 5:30 a.m. ET during his weekly general audience.
The text of the tweet, in Italian, flashed on the jumbo screens in the modernist Pope Paul VI Hall, where the audience was held. All his tweets were posted simultaneously in eight languages. Although anyone could find them on line, he had more than 1.3 million followers by 1 p.m. Eastern.
Although the pope may not send out each tweet -- an assistant will do it for him -- the Vatican insists that these "sparks of truth" will all have his input and approval. The pope is expected to tweet weekly and during papal ceremonies and feast days.




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